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Author Topic: .net clock  (Read 4464 times)

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Fox3

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.net clock
« on: November 07, 2010, 02:13:16 am »
Where did it go?

Laurent

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.net clock
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2010, 10:22:47 am »
It has never existed, the .Net framework already has this kind of classes. That's why there's no binding for the system and network module.
Laurent Gomila - SFML developer

poncho

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« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2011, 04:54:33 pm »
What classes can be used instead?

I've looked at Stopwatch but apparently people are saying ElapsedTicks is messed up and ElapsedMilliseconds always returns 0 for me.

JohnStabler

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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2012, 09:25:43 am »
I've found Window.GetFrameTime the best way to sync update events etc. The .NET timer and StopWatch classes just don't seem to cut it when working to 10s of milliseconds. Try this:

http://www.sfml-dev.org/tutorials/1.3/window-time.php

omeg

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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2012, 01:24:06 pm »
Stopwatch is the most precise timer, it's the equivalent of QueryPerformanceCounter Windows API. Check Stopwatch.Frequency property to see how often it updates.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.stopwatch.aspx